Archive | November 2012

Options for Insomnia – Sleeping Drugs, Antidepressants, Natural Remedies

The “Sleep in America” poll results that were recently released from the National Sleep Foundation found that more than half of all Americans (60%) said they experienced a sleep problem every night or almost every night.  This ranges from snoring, waking in the night, waking up too early, or feeling un-refreshed when getting up in the morning.  This overall increase in insomnia has been bringing people to their doctors, to stores, and to the Internet for solutions that may help them sleep better.

While most people would prefer to take a natural, non-addictive remedy without dangerous side-effects, there is a scarcity of effective natural options, as well as a lack of education and information available to people outside of their doctor’s office.  Often medical doctors recommend drugs, but surprisingly, not always the usual sleep medicines.

A ten-year study to discover which drugs are used to treat insomnia was published in the journal “Sleep”.  It found that from 1987 to 1996, prescriptions for sleeping drugs have decreased by 53.7%, but that antidepressant drugs prescribed for insomnia increased by a surprising 146%.  Examples of antidepressants that might be prescribed for insomnia are trazodone and amitriptyline.  According to Health.com, the side effects of these medicines may include sexual dysfunction, weight gain, dry mouth and throat, racing pulse, confusion, disturbed dreams, and an increased risk of suicide.

The authors of the study from the journal “Sleep” said:  “Surveys indicate a stable or increasing prevalence of sleep disturbance. There has also been a dramatic shift to use of antidepressants in lieu of sleeping drugs (hyponotics) for the symptomatic treatment of insomnia, despite a paucity (lack) of data regarding their efficacy and the potential for serious side effects.”

Regarding the nutritional approach to the problem of insomnia, Carl C. Pfeiffer, M.D., Ph.D., known for his work in orthomolecular (nutritional) medicine, says, “We have found that if a drug can be found to do the job of medical healing, a nutrient can be found to do the same job.”

Several research studies have shown certain minerals to be an effective natural insomnia remedy that helps people fall asleep and stay asleep through the night.  Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep. In one study, published in the European Neurology Journal, researchers found that calcium levels in the body are higher during some of the deepest levels of sleep, such as the rapid eye movement (REM) phase. The study concluded that disturbances in sleep, especially the absence of REM deep sleep or disturbed REM sleep, are related to a calcium deficiency.

Chronic insomnia is one of the main, central symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Sleep is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings. On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was shown in a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota. The study was titled “Effects of trace element nutrition on sleep patterns in adult women.” It’s important to note that a balanced ratio of twice as much calcium to magnesium is key to overall health, and that these two minerals should be taken together for best results.

Jobee Knight, a nutritional researcher and President of http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com in Glendale, CA., is someone who fought her own battle against sleeplessness and insomnia. She decided to put her background to use by searching out effective natural insomnia remedies for relaxation and deeper sleep. The result was Sleep Minerals II, which  contains easily assimilated forms of the best known minerals for relaxation and sleep — calcium and magnesium, combined with vitamin D and zinc.  The ingredients are formulated in a softgel with healthy oils, making them more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

L.C. of Massachusetts says: “Due to some very stressful issues in my life, I hadn’t slept much in two and a half months and I was prescribed sleeping drugs to take. I had become dependent on those drugs and couldn’t sleep without them. I did my research on the Internet and came across Sleep Minerals II. I started taking two before sleeping and now I can sleep through the whole night without drugs. I’m also able to easily fall back asleep if I do get up to use the bathroom in the night. Sleep Minerals II has also helped to alleviate my chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia symptoms.”

Insomnia is a widespread problem.  Going back to the “Father of Medicine’s” original words in 400 B. C., we would hear Hippocrates saying to his students: “Let thy food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Six Tips to Stay Asleep During the Night

Some people as they approach middle age may find it more difficult to stay asleep during the night.  This may be due to the decline of hormones in the body, such as estrogen or testosterone.  They can fall asleep okay and the first part of their night is fine, but around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m., they find themselves habitually awake and unable to get back to sleep.  Here are some tips that may help:

1.    Use a black eye mask to cover your eyes and use earplugs to keep the noise out.  A dark, cool room is most ideal to help the body produce melatonin, the hormone produced by the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycles.

2.    Get some sunlight by taking a walk during the day.  Being out in the sun will also set your wake-sleep cycle in a good way.  Additionally, the exercise and body movement helps with better, more restful sleep at night.

3.    If headaches or tension are keeping you up, try using some magnesium.  One German study found that 42 percent of the people taking magnesium reduced the duration and intensity of their migraine headaches.

4.    For females that experience hot flashes and night sweats during the night, take some extra steps to keep yourself and your bedroom cooler at night.  Wear lighter bedclothes, use less blankets, and you can also use a slightly damp washcloth on your forehead or neck.

5.    Calcium is directly related to our cycles of sleep, therefore highly absorbable calcium and magnesium supplements are effective.  The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis advises that during pre-menopause or menopause, the lack of estrogen and progesterone can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur such as irritability, leg cramps, insomnia, hot flashes and night sweats.

6.    It can work well for some people to take a calcium and magnesium supplement before bed.  Softgels that use natural oils mixed with the minerals are more fully absorbed.  These should have a 2 to 1 calcium magnesium ratio (twice as much calcium as magnesium).

This health information is provided by Nutrition Breakthroughs, maker of the effective natural insomnia remedy Sleep Minerals II.  This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleep and insomnia, as well as heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference.  I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours.  This has been a great improvement.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Teenagers Take Tests Best With 7 Hours of Sleep at Night

Article Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120210110510.htm

ScienceDaily – Whether or not you know any high school students that actually get nine hours of sleep each night, that’s what U.S. federal guidelines currently prescribe.  A new Brigham Young University study found that 16- to 18-year-olds perform better academically when they shave about two hours off that recommendation.

“We’re not talking about sleep deprivation,” says study author Eric Eide. “The data simply says that seven hours is optimal at that age.”

The new study by Eide and fellow BYU economics professor Mark Showalter is the first in a series of studies where they examine sleep and its impact on our health and education.

In the new study, the researchers tried to connect sleep to a measure of performance or productivity. Analyzing data from a representative sample of 1,724 primary and secondary school students across the country, they found a strong relationship between the amount of sleep youths got and how they fared on standardized tests.

But more sleep isn’t always better. As they report in the Eastern Economics Journal, the right amount of sleep decreases with age:

The optimal for 10-year-olds is 9 — 9.5 hours
The optimal for 12-year-olds is 8 — 8.5 hours
The optimal for 16-year-olds is 7 hours

“We don’t look at it just from a ‘your kid might be sleeping too much’ perspective,” Eide said. “From the other end, if a kid is only getting 5.5 hours of sleep a night because he’s overscheduled, he would perform better if he got 90 minutes more each night.”

Comment from the blog author Nutrition Breakthroughs:

Teenagers are a special breed, having to face all the challenges of being in an in-between stage of life; not quite a child anymore and not yet an adult.  Along with an acceleration of social interests and activities, they also sustain accelerated physical growth and increased nutritional needs.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 90% of teen girls and 70% of teen boys aren’t getting enough calcium.  Their bones are growing the fastest during the teen years and they need more calcium than at any other time of life.  This calcium deficiency can translate into irritability, nervous tension, hyperactivity and insomnia.

Due to a deficiency of crucial minerals at the teenage time of life, calcium and magnesium supplements can be an effective sleep remedy.  One natural insomnia remedy that’s gaining in popularity for people of all ages is Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com.   It contains potent forms of calcium, magnesium and vitamin D, all combined with heart-healthy rice bran oil in a rapidly absorbed softgel.  Softgels are better assimilated than tablets or capsules.

Wendy R. of Honolulu, Hawaii says: “My friends know that I’ve had chronic insomnia for a long time. Surprisingly, I received the Sleep Minerals II and began taking it and I actually slept. This thing really works. In the past if I ever got a good nights sleep I’d say “I slept like a baby”, but that’s the wrong comparison. Those little guys get up every two hours. I am actually beginning to sleep like an adult — a much-rested adult.”

For more information on Sleep Minerals II visit http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Natural Remedies for Hot Flashes, Night Sweats and Insomnia in Menopause

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) reports that an estimated 6,000 US women reach menopause each day, which translates to over 2 million women every year. The average age of natural menopause, which is the point of a woman’s last menstrual period, is 51.4. The Women’s Health Initiative study, which followed 16,608 women being given hormone replacement therapy (HRT), discovered a high risk of breast cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke from the use of these drugs. As a result, more and more women today are seeking the use of natural remedies for menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, migraine headaches, anxiety, fatigue, and insomnia.

Vitamin E is famous for it’s health benefits to glands and organs, however it may not be generally known that vitamin E is a proven remedy for hot flashes. Adelle Davis, the first nutritionist to base her recommendations on science-based studies, says: “During the menopause the need for vitamin E soars ten to fifty times over that previously required. Hot flashes and night sweats often disappear when 50 to 500 units of vitamin E are taken daily, but they quickly recur should the vitamin be stopped.”

One study supporting vitamin E is from the University of Iran, published in Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation in 2007.  400 IU of vitamin E in a softgel cap was given to the participants daily for four weeks. A diary was used to measure hot flashes before the study and at the end. The researchers concluded that vitamin E is effective and is a recommended treatment for hot flashes.

Another natural remedy has been making headlines lately. Mayo Clinic breast health specialist Sandhya Pruthi, M.D., conducted a study on flaxseed for hot flashes. The 29 participants in Mayo’s clinical trial were women with hot flashes who did not want to take estrogen because of increased risk of breast cancer. The study gave them six weeks of flaxseed therapy, consisting of 40 grams of crushed flaxseed eaten daily. The result was that the frequency of hot flashes decreased fifty percent. Participants also reported improvements in mood, joint or muscle pain, chills, and sweating. This was a significant improvement in their health and quality of life. Dr. Pruthi said: “We hope to find more effective nonhormonal options to assist women, and flaxseed looks promising.”

Pycnogenol is a natural plant extract from the bark of the maritime pine tree which grows exclusively along the coast of southwest France. In a study from Taiwan, 100 pre-menopausal women aged 45-55 years, were given 100-mg capsules of Pycnogenol or placebo twice daily (at breakfast and dinner) for 6 months in a double-blind manner. All menopause symptoms evaluated (including depression, hot flashes, night sweats, memory, attractiveness, anxiety, sexual symptoms, and sleep) improved significantly with Pycnogenol treatment, as early as one month after initiation of treatment. The researchers said, “Supplementation with Pycnogenol clearly reduced the frequency as well as the severity of pre-menopausal symptoms.”

Night sweats and hot flashes can become a form of insomnia in which a woman wakes up drenched in sweat and unable to sleep. Regarding mineral deficiency at the time of menopause, Adelle Davis says, “The amount of calcium in a woman’s blood parallels the activity of the ovaries. During the menopause, the lack of ovarian hormones (estrogen and progesterone) can cause severe calcium deficiency symptoms to occur, including irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, and insomnia. These problems can be easily overcome if the intakes of calcium, magnesium, and vitamin D are all generously increased and are well absorbed.”

One insomnia remedy becoming popular among menopausal women is Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com. This natural sleep aid contains highly absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium, the best minerals for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless legs syndrome, bone strength, and menopause insomnia.  The formula also includes vitamin D and zinc and is delivered in a softgel form with healthy carrier oils, making it more quickly absorbable than tablets or capsules and providing a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better, and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Life after menopause has been found to be a fulfilling time of life for many women. In a recent Gallup Poll sponsored by the North American Menopause Society, 51% of postmenopausal US women reported being the happiest and most fulfilled between ages 50 and 65. Menopause is an excellent time for a woman to keep her health at its peak and minimize symptoms such as night sweats and insomnia by using effective natural remedies.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html

Source: http://www.nutritionbreakthroughs.com/html/night_sweats_hot_flashes_remed.html

Menopause and Insomnia: The Magnesium and Calcium Link

Women in the pre-menopause and menopause years are more and more finding themselves experiencing symptoms of chronic insomnia, hot flashes, night sweats, migraine headaches, anxiety, fatigue and depression. Uzzi Reiss, M.D., author of Natural Hormone Balance for Women, says: “Some of the above reactions occur nearly simultaneously whenever the level of estrogen falls.”

Hormone drugs, nutritional remedies, and lifestyle changes are some of the options available to women. Consumer Affairs.com reports that while 70 percent of women entering menopause will have some symptoms, most symptoms can be managed with healthy lifestyle improvements. In their recent report, they do not recommend hormone drugs for women who have an elevated risk of heart disease, stroke or cancer – which is 35 to 50 percent of all women 50 and older.

As menopause approaches, another emerging link between estrogen decline and its symptoms is the aspect of mineral deficiency. Mildred Seeling, M.D. describes this in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. She says “Estrogen enhances magnesium utilization and uptake by soft tissues and bone, and may explain the resistance of young women to heart disease and osteoporosis — as well as the increased prevalence of these diseases when estrogen production ceases.”

Magnesium works best when it’s balanced with calcium. The pioneering nutritionist Adelle Davis writes of mineral deficiency during menopause in her book “Let’s Get Well.” Davis says: “Calcium is less well absorbed and the urinary losses are greater when the output of estrogen decreases. Such calcium-deficiency symptoms as nervousness, irritability, insomnia, and headaches are common.”

Chronic insomnia is one of the main symptoms of magnesium deficiency. Sleep in magnesium deficiency is usually agitated with frequent nighttime awakenings.  On the other hand, a high magnesium diet has been found to be associated with deeper, less interrupted sleep. This was shown in a study done by James Penland at the Human Nutrition Research Center in North Dakota.

Regarding the use of a sleep remedy for the relief of insomnia and other menopause symptoms, certain formulas may be more effective than others. The combination of minerals included and the presence of vitamin cofactors (such as vitamin D) in the product are key. Formulas should contain a 2 to 1 ratio of calcium to magnesium (twice as much calcium as magnesium). The original research on this recommended ratio appeared in 1935 in the Journal of Physiological Reviews.  In addition, a softgel form that blends the minerals with natural oils is more digestible than tablets or capsules.

Natural insomnia remedies for sleep, such as Sleep Minerals II from http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com are gaining popularity with menopausal women. Sleep Minerals II contains highly absorbable forms of  calcium, magnesium and Vitamin D – all combined in a softgel with carrier oils.  Adelle Davis says: “During the menopause… high amounts of calcium should be obtained and every step be taken to insure its absorption into the blood. When these precautions are taken and the diet is adequate in other respects, the woman at menopause usually loses her irritability, hot flashes, night sweats, leg cramps, insomnia, and mental depression.”

Anita L. of New Caney, Texas says: “I was having hot flashes every 30 minutes to an hour through the night and was so miserable.  After about two weeks of taking the Sleep Minerals, I noticed an incredible difference with my sleep.  I have much less interruption from flashes, I’m sleeping much better, and I’m a lot more comfortable.”

Valerie H. of Santa Clarita, California says: “I had such severe menopause insomnia it took me hours to fall asleep even though I was extremely tired.  My legs also had crawling and tingling feelings at night. I got the Sleep Minerals and after a few days, it started to work really well. I fall asleep now within 20 minutes and no more restless legs.”

Consumer Reports advises that hormone drugs can increase the risk of heart disease, breast cancer, blood clots and stroke. An increasing number of women are turning to non-pharmaceutical remedies for insomnia. Highly absorbable forms of natural minerals can be a soothing alternative.

For more information on Sleep Minerals II, visit http://www.NutritionBreakthroughs.com/html/sleep_remedy_for_insomnia_help.html